I have a third #electricVehicle now! #oneWheel #ev #lastMile

March 22nd, 2017 § Comments Off on I have a third #electricVehicle now! #oneWheel #ev #lastMile § permalink

It happened.

 

After much thinking and musing my mellow mood on missing out on oneWheel+ delivery schedule I decided to go and nip it in the bud.
So I hopped down to Santa Monica – oneWheel reseller b8ta had it in stock, had it on demo, had it brand new. 
Tried it. 
 
Bought it.
 
Not the oneWheel+ (latest most) but rather the classic proven&strayed, legendary current model. If anything, I will probably pick the + version once I learn this one through and pass this down to my wife (I hope) as it always more fun sharing the ride with someone, Else it’s nearly impossible to explain what it’s like. 
There is not other alternative to this oneWheel experience.
 
So be prepared to be spammed with my posts re this sublime electric “zeroEmission” ride-surf!
Unpack view

 

Bluecity to launch first 100% electric car sharing service at Gatwick Airport

October 16th, 2016 § Comments Off on Bluecity to launch first 100% electric car sharing service at Gatwick Airport § permalink

The UK’s Gatwick Airport has announced a new partnership with Bluecity for the introduction of a new electric point-to-point car sharing service, to make journeys eco-friendly, and easier for passengers travelling to and from the airport.

The scheme will be the first of its kind for a UK airport, with five charging points set to be introduced at Gatwick in the coming months. Vehicles can be reserved in advance. Passengers will have the freedom to collect vehicles from Gatwick and drop off at dedicated charging points across London.

The new partnership with Bluecity also represents a key step in Gatwick’s aim of becoming the UK’s most sustainable airport. Electric vehicles are an essential component in tackling London’s air quality, and the partnership will contribute to Gatwick’s strategy to cut its carbon footprint in half by 2020.
Gatwick Airport’s Chief Commercial Officer, Guy Stephenson, said: ‘Gatwick is at the forefront of driving greater sustainability into aviation, and aims to be the UK’s most sustainable airport by 2020. A key component of this is reducing the carbon footprint of surface access, and this unique electric vehicle partnership with Bluecity is an example of how Gatwick Airport intends to make this a reality.

‘This innovative new car sharing service also gives additional sustainable transport choices to 42 million passengers now travelling through Gatwick each year, plus more than 21,000 people employed across the airport campus. We’re sure it will be very popular.’
Cedric Bollore, Director of Development at Group Bollore, said: ‘We look forward to collaborating with Gatwick Airport and offering passengers the opportunity to drive one of our electric cars. 

‘We are convinced that electric vehicles are the future and the solution to reducing air pollution in the UK.’
Gatwick Airport has served over 42 million passengers in the past 12 months. The new scheme will provide greater convenience for business passengers or groups of travellers travelling to and from the capital, the airport said in a release.

Source: http://www.travel-news.co.uk/10515/2016/10/bluecity-to-launch-first-100-electric-car-sharing-service-at-gatwick-airport/

How “small” is “enough” for young family with BMW i3 #electricCar?

September 25th, 2016 § Comments Off on How “small” is “enough” for young family with BMW i3 #electricCar? § permalink

Let’s talk buggies.
There are aplenty of options, but with ou Bugaboo chameleon option, boot space consumption is exact, we’re lucky to fit it in to be honest. And it just about closes. Just.

Fair do, it’s individual parent’s right/choice of a buggy. Bugaboo model we’ve picked is tad chunky, I suspect (and only now)


And so, the question is…. (Not “will it blend?”) will it fit into the boot… In our new fancy BMW i3 electric car upgrade (from our trusty Nissan Leaf)

It does. Just about. This is the picture of how it all fits in, before boot closes. Just about.

And the car seat? Separate story. More to follow. Here how the baby baby seat looks fitted from driver’s perspective.

So, for all parents. To be or current. Hope all FYI helps.

Mahindra – India-made #electricCar for the city. Small, Dinky and straight through pragmatic. What do you think?

June 30th, 2016 § Comments Off on Mahindra – India-made #electricCar for the city. Small, Dinky and straight through pragmatic. What do you think? § permalink


I have had recently had the pleasure test driving the Mahindra e2o “UK”.The e2o (pronounced ee-two-oh) is the successor of the REVAi (or G-Wiz as it was known in the UK).

Specification there about just shy of 20kwh, this ride will charge at home via 13A plug in 9 hours.

Full specification here

With two variant options: Base model 13k (not toys: satnav, Rev camera, rapid charger) and premium model 15k – all extras included, it’s a curious deal.

Battery warranty is 3 years, I am told comes packed with the latest technology spec – which does make me wonder why warranty period is so short then. If anything I should expect my “concerns”  about batteries should be addressed by the great warranty period, right?

Moving swiftly on.

The test drive was a great buzz.

Having owned the likes of  Mitsubishi imiev (evmeerkat, really), Nissan Leaf, now Renault twizy and BMW i3, I have come across all sort of specs, comfort levels, – acceleration somewhere in between of twizy and imiev models. Not slow by any means. Steady more like, decent and as expected.

I won’t pretend that I enjoyed the look of the gWizz or even had a test drive in one. Not my cuppa even if you paid me.(t&cs apply)

But I would personally be sensibly content committing in e2o in and around London Town, into work and so on. It looks.. Interesting, may get less attention than my twizy, but with good comfort levels inside. Heating, modern conveniences, I won’t be too concerned pushing the distance.

Distance which is about realistically speaking is 60-70 miles per 100% charge. I am not certain about the nuance of the heater energy comsumption, so will Leave the range estimates as they are.

Charging 0-90% in 90 minutes at the rapid charger….. Well? Personally not my level of comfort here. Last thing I would ever wish to do is sit at the rapid charger somewhere on the M1 say, and wait a hour+ to help me along my trip. No thanks.

However there are individual package selections. It’s basic trip – and I mean basic – no android powered sat nav there, and no Rapid Charging – which should not be called…. Just “faster charging”, or all in one, with the premium trim.

There is room for 4 adults but boot-space wise, as expected is enough to accommodate the adapters and the charging cables only.

I definitely have mixed feelings about the price. 13k for the basic model and 15 for the “best trim”, I do wonder how that would compete in the current EV Market, where Zoe or even a Nissan Leaf could be had for the 15k all inclusive offering more proper “Rapid Charing” and  roomier even if modern convenience lacking…

What do you think?

Observe that there are different letters to the usual “D” for Drive. A bit confusing. I am assured this is to be addressed in the latter updates to the model..

Straight forward, no nonsense key fob.

High, reasonably comfortable sitting position. again, nothing striking, unusual, beside the full-blue illuminated instrument panel. SatNav is an android OS device which provides generic satnav. nothing special

The usual 12V socket, but with an USB plug and an AUX.

Batteries sit under the rear seat…

Rear seating for two.

Frunk is surprisingly spacious… ? if thats a thing, on such a micro-micro car

 

Here are more snaps for your perusal…

The Thing with this Mahindra, is this very point… Is it good enough?

There is nothing special about it. There is nothing novel, there is nothing new.

The question is, does the price tag justify the means? Are We, experienced EV drivers and curious potential owners alike feel that the look & feel of the car should justify the tag, and indeed is this [spec] enough to  “Go Team Mahindra”.

Are we just expecting another zero-emission vehicle to the range list, or do we actually look for something special?

After all, Electric Vehicles are often treated like gadgets after all, and in my view, the more special they are, the more i want to have one. Or am I wrong, and there is a good market for just another car, which happens to be electric?

What do you think?

Norway: Why do they love electric cars in the Arctic Circle?

June 11th, 2016 § Comments Off on Norway: Why do they love electric cars in the Arctic Circle? § permalink

Tromso, a Norwegian city known as the “Gateway to the Arctic”, receives no sunlight for two months of the year.
Yet this remote, beautiful, snowy city is the unlikely focus of the global electric car industry, attracting the attention of Silicon Valley entrepreneurs such as Elon Musk, founder of electric car maker Tesla.
His company has recently opened a showroom there – its most northerly outpost.
Why? Because Norway, it seems, is simply nuts about electric cars.
The country is the world leader in electric cars per capita and has just become the fourth country in the world to have 100,000 of them on the roads.
When you consider the other nations on the list are the US (population: 320 million), Japan (pop. 130 million) and China (pop. 1.35 billion), then that is quite an achievement for this rugged, sparsely populated country of just five million.

Some of its politicians want to ban the sale of new petrol and diesel cars by 2025, which prompted Musk to tweet: “What an amazingly awesome country. You guys rock!!”
On an earlier visit in April, he attributed a lot of Tesla’s success to the country’s pioneering stance on electric cars.
So how has Norway managed it? 

Elisabeth Bryn helps explain the answer. The 56-year-old teacher enjoys driving in the icy streets of Tromso and she can barely contain her excitement as she misses our turn.
“It is such a good feeling to drive a clean car. It means I have a clean conscience and it works out cheaper in the long run,” she tells the BBC.
But it is economic incentive as much as environmental concern that is fuelling the rise in green cars – Norway introduced a raft of generous subsidies to encourage people to go electric.

Electric Car Incentive List 

  • No purchase taxes
  • Exemption from 25% VAT on purchase
  • Low annual road tax
  • No charges on toll roads or ferries
  • Free municipal parking
  • Access to bus lanes
  • 50% reduction in company car tax
  • No VAT on leasing

It launched an aggressive tax policy towards high-polluting cars, while offering zero tax on zero-emission cars. This “polluter pays” policy brought the cost of an electric car into line with a conventionally powered one.
Bryn is clearly shrewd about the numbers and says the entire cost of her car will be recouped within eight years thanks to the tax and fuel savings.

Free juice

But aren’t people worried about running out of power? Lack of range is the electric car’s Achilles heel after all.
This is where Norway comes into its own, as Bryn demonstrates at a public charging point on an industrial estate out of town.
 The electricity being pumped into her car is free.

Norway is fortunate enough to have close to 100% renewable and cheap hydro power production.
According to the Norwegian Electric Vehicle Association, even if all three million cars on the country’s roads were electric, they would suck up just 5-6% of the annual hydro power electricity production.
Elisabeth Bryn loves her electric car, but some of her friends worry about flat batteries

Rapid charging points can pump her Nissan Leaf with up to 80% charge in just 30 minutes. Alternatively, Bryn can charge her car at home at a much slower pace overnight.
It helps that Norway is also the biggest oil producer in Western Europe and the world’s third largest exporter of natural gas. In other words, Norway is rich enough to subsidise its electric car lifestyle.

Range anxiety

But despite these considerable perks, not everyone is convinced.
In Oslo there are more than 14,000 electric cars – about 30% of the market. But in the more northern reaches – cities like Tromso – enthusiasm has been more muted.
This may be explained by the tough terrain and “range anxiety” – concerns that a flat battery will leave them stranded in arctic conditions.
Can electric cars perform as well in far northern climes?

Studies have shown that electric car performance can deteriorate markedly in extreme cold or hot conditions. And Nissan, whose Leaf model is the biggest selling electric vehicle in Norway, admits that the car’s 124-mile maximum range can fall significantly in icier conditions when the heating, lights and demister are all draining the charge more thirstily.
Bryn says such concerns have put off some of her friends: “They have a cabin deep in the countryside and said they just couldn’t trust an electric car to get them there. They said there just weren’t enough charging points.”

Yet Tesla’s new showroom in Tromso, and the steady growth in the number of public charging points, demonstrates the industry’s commitment to spreading the green message no matter how inhospitable the environment.

And the rest of the world is learning lessons from Norway.

Germany has just announced a €1bn (£784m; $1.1bn) incentive scheme to get more consumers buying electric cars, for example.
Christian Ruoff, publisher of US electric car magazine, Charged, sums it up: “Electric car makers in the US see Norway as a window into the future.
“Norway shows that if governments can make electric cars as affordable as petrol equivalents then motorists, even in the Arctic Circle, will buy them.
“It also busts the myths that electric cars and their batteries are only suitable for cities with more moderate climates like Oslo or San Francisco.”

Source: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-36402942

UK & Ireland’s answer to Route 66 to be driven… in an electric car!

March 24th, 2016 § Comments Off on UK & Ireland’s answer to Route 66 to be driven… in an electric car! § permalink

2,500 mile bucket list road trip is being driven for the first time this April.

The official ‘Route 57’ electric car will be hitting the road and heading through 57 must-see destinations across England, Wales, Scotland and Ireland. The road trip runs from 6- 26 April, starting in Plymouth and ending in Galway, visiting villages, towns, and cities along the way.

Route 57 was designed as the UK and Ireland’s answer to US Route 66, by Jurys Inn Hotels who are supplying accommodation along the way, to the driver, motoring journalist Jess Shanahan. Jess will be doing the road trip in a KIA Soul EV supplied by electric car leasing company DriveElectric, and stopping at charging stations along the route, mapped out by ZapMap.

As well as promoting local tourism, the campaign’s use of an electric vehicle (EV) seeks to challenge common myths around electric cars. A recent survey by the AA (infographic available for use as long as credit with a link to source is given) shows that the ‘range’ of an EV is one of the top reasons why people are not buying electric cars. The Route 57 campaign will show that these perceptions do not match reality with today’s green car technology, and that an electric car can drive more than 2,580 miles across four countries.

Jess will be posting updates on the Route 57 website: www.route57.org.uk along with Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram – and taking driving music suggestions through the Twitter hashtag #route57, or adding them directly to the Route 57 Spotify playlist. Audiobook suggestions are also welcome – Jess will be fittingly listening to Bill Bryson’s ‘Notes from a Small Island’ to begin with.

More information & contact:

See Route 57 Media Pack and/or contact: Ardziv Simonian asimonian@agenda21digital.com
Phone: +44 (0)2070360774, Mobile: 07735808868
Additional notes:

Jurys Inns Hotels designed the original Route 57 road trip as an equivalent to US Route 66, which has a similar mileage and drive-time, to help people explore the UK & Ireland, and encourage local tourism
An estimated 200,000 people travel from across America and the world every year to drive all or part of the iconic Route 66 (1) stretching from Chicago to Los Angeles, providing jobs and revenue from tourists which generates millions of dollars for locations along the route. (2)
Route 66 has great historical and cultural significance, forming part of a ‘bucket list’ for many people, and ranked by Britons in the top 10 of ‘things to do before you die’. (3)
Sources:
(1) Route 66 Recommissioning Initiative: http://www.bringbackroute66.com/theplan.html

(2)Route 66 Economic Impact Study, by Rutgers University: https://www.wmf.org/publication/route-66-economic-impact-study-synthesis-findings

(3) Average British bucket list 2014, survey by Engage Mutual: http://www.onefamily.com/our-story/media-centre/2014/surprises-in-average-british-bucket-list/

Nissan Carwings APP Stats: Jan 2016 #EV #electricCar Miles travelled 500, electricity cost estimated £15 – typical cost of electric car “fuel”

February 14th, 2016 § Comments Off on Nissan Carwings APP Stats: Jan 2016 #EV #electricCar Miles travelled 500, electricity cost estimated £15 – typical cost of electric car “fuel” § permalink

Something I discovered in the update carwings aka Nissan Connect app lately.

It’s been a while since I have used it, due to faulty/buggy previous edition and reliance on third party apps to kick off that remote climate control.

It appears things have really turned about, first day use here, so more to be told on reliability of such update app, Nissan, and I do say “Re-Launched”, – I have however enjoy looking over the travel metrics – something which previous version lacked. 

All these electric miles, kWh consumption and Eco-driving statistics was/is available online, via the web portal, but was not, however in the app form. Now that this has all been combined, it’s handy, helpful and downright encouraging.

Example of our January Nissan Leaf Travels. 500 miles covered, some 150 odd kWh electricity used at cost of some £15 odd pounds. All handy statistics supposed to help budget, plan and improve on Eco driving. Kudos To Nissan.

Estimated Cost of driving our “Linda” in January   
Our driving stats for that month January 2016, our driving economy, and consumption outlined.

 
All in all, I welcome this update. 

Nissan Carwings APP Stats: Jan 2016 #EV Miles travelled 500, electricity cost estimated £15

February 14th, 2016 § Comments Off on Nissan Carwings APP Stats: Jan 2016 #EV Miles travelled 500, electricity cost estimated £15 § permalink

Something I discovered in the update carwings aka Nissan Connect app lately.

It’s been a while since I have used it, due to faulty/buggy previous edition and reliance on third party apps to kick off that remote climate control.

It appears things have really turned about, first day use here, so more to be told on reliability of such update app, Nissan, and I do say “Re-Launched”, – I have however enjoy looking over the travel metrics – something which previous version lacked. 

All these electric miles, kWh consumption and Eco-driving statistics was/is available online, via the web portal, but was not, however in the app form. Now that this has all been combined, it’s handy, helpful and downright encouraging.

Example of our January Nissan Leaf Travels. 500 miles covered, some 150 odd kWh electricity used at cost of some £15 odd pounds. All handy statistics supposed to help budget, plan and improve on Eco driving. Kudos To Nissan.

Estimated Cost of driving our “Linda” in January   
Our driving stats for that month January 2016, our driving economy, and consumption outlined.

 
All in all, I welcome this update. 

How much I’ve saved in petrol/diesel fuel cost while driving an electric Nissan Leaf? 

January 3rd, 2016 § Comments Off on How much I’ve saved in petrol/diesel fuel cost while driving an electric Nissan Leaf?  § permalink

Folks,

Just completed my second service here for my Nissan Leaf,
– major service £149

– New Set of Tyres £ 139

All good, fair play. Good job. Now all this made me stumble across another point, it appears we have covered a lot of miles in 2 years and 3 months of our lease. Never mind the excess pm charge of 4.8p/pm we gonna cough up (over 10k/a x3)

   

Quick calculator check – see menu on left or click here  

 
Indicating Saving of £2,800 in fuel costs over that period…
Result!

That’s nearly £110/month saving. So effective lease figure of £290/month is actually £180/month in real terms.

Not shabby.

More soon!

10 months to go Until my New #EV Lease! Now what should that next car be? hmm. ideas? #UK

December 30th, 2015 § Comments Off on 10 months to go Until my New #EV Lease! Now what should that next car be? hmm. ideas? #UK § permalink

My Nissan Leaf Lease Expiry CountDown or rather CountDown to my new #ev Deal!

Woohoo! 10 months and counting (down) until my new Electric Vehicle Lease.
Now, what would it be?.. hmm

Options Considered:

  • BMW i3 with Range Extender?
  • Outlander PHEV?
  • Mercedes Benz B Class Electric?
  • Bigger better leaf 30KWh?
  • Golf PHEV?

 

I guess, this summer, it’s time to Get Deal Hunting… for timely October 2016 Delivery

Requirements:

  • Big Boot (same as Leaf or bigger)
  • Minimum 25 EV Miles Range for daily commute on a single charge (even in winter)
  • Cheap(ish) and Longer Travel requirements.

Where Am I?

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