Ford Wants To Develop Its Own Battery Chemistries For Hybrids, Electric Cars, But Why?

When it announced a range increase for its 2017 Focus Electric earlier this month, Ford executives also revealed an intriguing snippet about the company’s battery plans.

The company is conducting its own research into fundamental battery chemistries, and could develop its own cells for use in future electrified vehicles.

The question then becomes: Why? Continue reading Ford Wants To Develop Its Own Battery Chemistries For Hybrids, Electric Cars, But Why?

USA Breaking Update: Nissan Prices LEAF Battery Replacement at $5,499, New Packs More Heat Durable

How Much Will A Replacement 24 kWh LEAF Battery Set You Back ? $5,499

To say that consumers have been waiting on a hard and firm pricing for a replacement 24 kWh battery pack in the Nissan LEAF (or any plug-in really for that matter) would be an understatement.

“Resetting” The Range On Your LEAF – Now Reasonably Priced

Well, wonder no longer as $5,499 plus the turn-in of your old pack (which Nissan values at $1,000) nets you a new “2015 spec” battery replacement.

Using $6,499 as a full MSRP on the pack means Nissan is putting a price of $270/kWh on the cells.
Continue reading USA Breaking Update: Nissan Prices LEAF Battery Replacement at $5,499, New Packs More Heat Durable

The battery tech that could change electric cars

Volkswagen is testing a new type of battery that it says could be four times as powerful as existing technology

Volkswagen is bench testing new battery chemistry capable of providing “between three and four times the power” from a given capacity. This would mean up to 80kWh from a similar volume occupied by the current Golf Blue-e-motion’s 26.5kWh battery pack.

That’s according to Dr Heinz-Jakob Neusser, VW board member responsible for development. Speaking at the Geneva motor show, he said that the company has tested lithium-ion batteries with its existing cell supplier (Sanyo) with between 24 and 28kWh and also up to 37kWh, but “an 80kWh unit is under development using our own technology. It would provide between three and four times the battery power in a given package.”

Neusser refuses to name the battery chemistry, but doesn’t deny it is a lithium-air unit, which are capable of delivering huge amounts of power, but are in the very early stages of development.

As to how far a plug-in hybrid or pure battery car could travel in electric mode with such a battery, Neusser says that depends on what the customer wants. He suggests that as a second car, most customers will settle for about 200km (124 miles) of electric range, but as the family’s main transport a battery would have to provide a much greater range.

Neusser also confirmed that VW’s fuel cell research has switched to a conventional water/hydrogen cell proton exchange membrane cell rather than the phosphoric acid high temperature cell research the company was engaged in some years ago.

Continue reading The battery tech that could change electric cars