Council aims to turbo-charge electric car use in Oxford

June 22nd, 2016 § Comments Off on Council aims to turbo-charge electric car use in Oxford § permalink

Council aiming to turbo-charge electric car use in Oxford
AN ATTEMPT to jump-start Oxford’s slow uptake of electric vehicles is now in motion, with up to 30 new charging points arriving in the next 12 months.
People and businesses across the city are being called on to help develop the plan and find suitable places for the trial stations, which will be bought in the summer.
In April this year Oxford City Council received an £800,000 grant to add an extra 100 charging stations to the city – where only 85 people currently drive electric cars.
John Tanner, the council’s board member for climate change, said: “What we have at the moment is the early adopters, the enthusiasts.
“But with more plug-in points around the city, I think more people are going to take the plunge and buy electric vehicles.”
There are currently 13 on-street charging stations around Oxford, of which three, Summertown Car Park, Cowley Road and Worcester Street Car Park, have reported faults.
It is hoped the 100 new devices will begin to be rolled out in 2018, making make electric vehicle ownership possible for 16,000 extra homes.
Mr Tanner added that another barrier to more people making the switch was the initial cost of a vehicle, which he said was comparatively “quite high”.
But he added: “We have to get into our heads that although these vehicles cost a lot to buy in the first place, they are very cheap to run, and don’t pollute the atmosphere.
“A petrol or diesel vehicle is pumping nitrogen dioxide into Oxford’s atmosphere. To switch to renewable energy from fossil fuel is the right way to go.”
Those already driving an ultra-low emission vehicle (ULEV) could struggle to get around Oxford due to a lack of available charge points.
Low Carbon Hub CEO Barbara Hammond, who lives in a terraced house on Osney Island, bought a Toyota Prius Plug-in hybrid – which can switch between electrical power and fuel-burning – three years ago.
She said: “When we get the space outside we would like to plug in from our house and use a ‘cable gully’ – a safe means of getting the cable across the pavement.
“If you live in a city being able to charge it is an issue. A lot of people would have an electric vehicle if they could be sure of charging it.”
Research recently carried out by the city council suggested one in five people would consider going electric with their next vehicle.
Giles Dobson, 37, the owner of Oxford River Cruises based at Folly Bridge, said he would definitely buy an electric car if there were a place to charge it.
The Lake Street resident said: “My introduction to electric vehicles was the boats we operate – they’re electrically propelled themselves.
“To me the attraction of electric vehicles is the environmental benefit primarily, but also they have company car and tax benefits.”
Mr Dobson was among a small group of Oxford residents who met with the council on June 8 to discuss having a charging point on their street.
He added: “Lake Street is one of the worst for on-street parking because of the community centre, the health centre and the swimming pool.
“This scheme would make it feasible for me to get an electric car.”

Source: http://m.oxfordtimes.co.uk/news/14567364.Council_aiming_to_turbo_charge_electric_car_use_in_Oxford/

Tough but gotta be done: Netherlands may ban sale of non-electric cars by 2025

April 23rd, 2016 § Comments Off on Tough but gotta be done: Netherlands may ban sale of non-electric cars by 2025 § permalink

Times are changing folks and yet human attitude towards worsening air pollution and climate change is all slow behaviours which, unless have the tangible impact, are rarely well pondered upon.

This is why I personally gotta commend Duth government on their effort, forced hand, in fact to make legal steps to ensure that Changes are Made and Made Now rather than later, and promote zero emission transportation, with this proposal to make it illegal to sell pure fossil-fuelled car from 2025 in the country.

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Europe’s developing market in on-street charging points and hydrogen fuelling stations will be given a boost if the Dutch parliament passes a law that would ban the sale of non-electric cars by 2025.
The bill was initiated by the Labour party, and has attracted sufficient support in the lower house of the Dutch parliament. It will become law if it gains the approval of the Dutch senate.
If introduced, the law would give a regulatory push to the market for electric vehicles. At present, consumers are deterred from buying non-petrol or diesel vehicles because of the lack of charging infrastructure, and companies are deterred from installing the infrastructure because of the lack of cars to use it. 
There are signs that this chicken-and-egg problem is beginning to be overcome in the battery car market, particularly in the Netherlands. Last year, 43,000 new electric vehicles were purchased in the country, giving them a 10% share of the market. In Norway, the leader in electric vehicle adoption, that figure is 22%. By contrast, electric vehicles make up only 1% of UK sales and 0.35% of Canadian sales. 
Howerver, hydrogen fuelled cars still face barriers. At present there are few ways to refuel a fuel-cell-powered car.
Shell has made a start on installing hydrogen stations, having set up a partnership in Germany with industrial gas manufacturers Air Liquide and Linde, car maker Daimler and energy companies Total and OMV, to develop a network of 400 hydrogen refuelling stations by 2023. However, only three stations have been set up.
The UK government last year made £6.6m ($9.5m) available to set up 12 hydrogen refuelling stations across the UK, including new Brentford and Croydon outside London, and a mobile station that will be used across the south of England.
Despite the lack of a fuel network, production model hydrogen cars are beginnign to appear. Yesterday, 21 April, Toyota annouced that it would introduce the Mirai to the UK. The £66,000 ($95,000) four-door Mirai (it means “future” in Japanese) is part of the car maker’s plan to shift to alternative fuels as soon as possible – a decision that will be vindicated if the Netherlands enacts its law, and other countries follow suit. 
So far, the city of Oslo is looking to ban private cars by 2019 and the mayor of Paris has announced that the city will be rid of diesel cars by 2020.
The process of building a hydrogen refuelling station is shown here.
Toyota’s take on the rapidly changing car industry is shown here.

From http://www.globalconstructionreview.com/news/netherlands-may-ban-sale-n7on-elec7tric-c7ars-2025/

100 electric car charging stations to be installed around Oxford in world’s biggest scheme

January 25th, 2016 § Comments Off on 100 electric car charging stations to be installed around Oxford in world’s biggest scheme § permalink

ONE HUNDRED new charging points will be created in residential streets in Oxford to make electric vehicle ownership possible for 16,000 extra homes.

The largest pilot of its kind in the world will begin when 30 trial points of various kinds are installed in pavements and lampposts by the end of this year.

The most successful types of charger points will then be rolled out in 100 residential streets around the city, probably from 2018.

Oxford City Council and Oxfordshire County Council hope to encourage thousands more people to buy electric cars to help cut emissions in the city.

City executive board member for climate change, John Tanner, said: “Climate change and poor air quality are two of the biggest issues facing Oxford and we all need to do everything we can to cut vehicle emissions.

“However, for people living in Oxford’s beautiful but narrow terraced streets, charging an electric car is a real problem. This project aims to remove that barrier.

“By installing 100 electric charging points, we are going to turn the Oxford into a city filled with electric avenues.” » Read the rest of this entry «

UK to have Tighter rules for Plug-in Car Grant

December 21st, 2015 § Comments Off on UK to have Tighter rules for Plug-in Car Grant § permalink

The UK Government is to continue its Plug-in Car Grant, intended to encourage motorists to buy electric cars – but the criteria are being tightened up.

Introduced in 2011 and previously extended until February 2016, the scheme will now continue until at least the end of March 2018.

However the most an electric car buyer will be able to claim back will be £4,500, instead of £5,000 as currently.

Also from March 2016 grants will be made in two categories. Cars offering a zero-emissions range, effectively all-electric, of more than 70 miles will be known as Category 1 and qualify for the £4,500. The vast majority of today’s plug-in hybrids, however will qualify for Category 2 and 3, in which the grant will be worth only £2,500.

Also Category 2 or 3 vehicles retailing at more than £60,000 will not be eligible for any grant.

According to Government figures around 50,000 owners have claimed payments under the grant since it was introduced, with numbers growing – 29 ULEVs (Ultra Low Emission Vehicles) are now available on the UK market, some five times more than in 2011 when the grant was introduced.

“Extending the grant in a sustainable way ensures more than 100,000 people will benefit from financial support when purchasing these cheap-to-run and green cars,” Transport Minister Andrew Jones says.

“We are determined to keep Britain at the forefront of the technology, increasing our support for plug-in vehicles to £600 million over the next five years to cut emissions, create jobs and support our cutting-edge industries,” he adds.

The announcement is being welcomed by UK motor industry body the Society of Motor Manufacturers & Traders, CEO Mike Hawes saying the grant has helped Britain become the fastest-growing market for ultra-low emission vehicles in Europe.

“The recently agreed global climate change targets underscore the important contribution ultra-low emission vehicles make – and will continue to make – to reducing carbon emissions,” Hawes adds.

“Manufacturers are offering increasing numbers of these vehicles – but a consistently applied incentive regime is still needed over the coming years to help consumers adopt these ground-breaking technologies.”

Those who want to charge at home will still be supported, but with less money.
Those who want to charge at home will still be supported, but not to the same extent as previously.
Home charge grant cut

The Government has also said that it will continue to offer ULEV owners who want to install a home charging point a grant of up to £500 towards the cost. This is around half of the likely cost and down from the current £700 maximum grant, and has been criticised by David Martell, CEO of Chargemaster, the largest provider and operator of charging points in the UK.

“Reducing support for electric car owners to install a charger at home is premature and a step backwards for UK carbon reduction and the necessary push towards air quality improvement,” Mr Martell says.

“It means that many plug in hybrid vehicle drivers will simply not bother fitting a charger at home and run their cars on fossil fuel instead. To get the full benefit of owning an EV, a homecharger is vital.”

Bit overdue: Are we on the brink of an electric car revolution?

July 2nd, 2015 § Comments Off on Bit overdue: Are we on the brink of an electric car revolution? § permalink

Carlos Ghosn, the fast-talking head of the Renault-Nissan alliance, is not keen to be drawn on targets for electric car sales. A 2011 prediction of 1.5m Renault-Nissan electric vehicles by 2016 turned out to be wildly optimistic. The group just passed the 250,000 mark.

Ghosn was not alone. President Barack Obama predicted 1m electric cars in the US by 2015: in January the total was 280,000. Virgin boss Richard Branson, adept as ever at grabbing headlines, said this week that “no new road cars will be petrol driven” within 20 years, calling combustion engines “complicated and antiquated”.
» Read the rest of this entry «

Ultra Low Emission Zone

April 6th, 2015 § Comments Off on Ultra Low Emission Zone § permalink

Following a public consultation, the Mayor has confirmed the introduction of the Ultra Low Emission Zone (ULEZ) in the Capital on 7 September 2020. This will encourage the use of newer, cleaner vehicles, improving the quality of life and health of Londoners.

ULEV ZONE 2020

The ULEZ will operate 24 hours a day, 7 days a week in the same area as the current Congestion Charging zone (CCZ). All cars, motorcycles, vans, minibuses and Heavy Goods Vehicles (HGVs) will need to meet exhaust emission standards (ULEZ standards) or pay an additional daily charge to travel within the zone.

There will be no barriers and tollbooths. Cameras will read your number plate as you enter, leave or drive within the zone and check it against the database of those who meet the ULEZ standards or need to pay the daily charge.

The ULEZ standards are in addition to the Congestion Charge and the Low Emission Zone requirements.
» Read the rest of this entry «

Keeping up with chargeable electric vehicles and renewable energy

October 16th, 2014 § Comments Off on Keeping up with chargeable electric vehicles and renewable energy § permalink

By 2020 it’s estimated between 500,000 and 2million electric vehicles will be used daily in the UK. This, in itself, presents a number of challenges for the electricity network. 

For more than 50 years these have been designed on the assumption that no household uses all appliances at once and also not at the same time as neighbours. 

However, questions about whether this is still valid are being raised with the advent of electric vehicles and shift to more renewable power. If, for example, everyone charges their cars at the same time, for those few hours the networks would go in to overload. 

» Read the rest of this entry «

Keeping up with chargeable devices, electric vehicles and renewable energy

October 16th, 2014 § Comments Off on Keeping up with chargeable devices, electric vehicles and renewable energy § permalink

By 2020 it’s estimated between 500,000 and 2million electric vehicles will be used daily in the UK. This, in itself, presents a number of challenges for the electricity network. 

For more than 50 years these have been designed on the assumption that no household uses all appliances at once and also not at the same time as neighbours. 

However, questions about whether this is still valid are being raised with the advent of electric vehicles and shift to more renewable power. If, for example, everyone charges their cars at the same time, for those few hours the networks would go in to overload. 

» Read the rest of this entry «

New electric car club in Stratford is first of its kind in UK

September 10th, 2014 § Comments Off on New electric car club in Stratford is first of its kind in UK § permalink

The future is looking brighter – and greener – for Stratford as it launches its own Electric Car Club.

Stratford’s pay-per-use E-Car Club is the first of its kind in the UK – offering residents all the benefits of electric travel at a fraction of the cost of owning a vehicle, writes Jessica McKay .

E-Car Club managing director, Chris Morris, said: ‘We’re confident the programme will reduce transport emissions and provide a cheap, fun, flexible way to get around the town and county.”

The club currently owns four cars, each of which has its own specifically designated parking space and electric charging point at locations including town centre car parks and at Stratford Parkway station.

Two Renault ZOEs are available to hire from the town centre locations, and two Nissan Leaf vehicles are based at Stratford Parkway rail station. The cars can travel 90 miles when fully charged, making them ideal for short, regional journeys.

Any driver over the age of 19 can book an E-Car for £5.50 per hour or £45 per day by phone or online. The fees include tax, insurance and maintenance, so there are no ‘hidden costs’ for drivers.

Mr Morris added: “We’re committed to ensuring that the vehicles are a cost effective option for those that need them most, including low income households and the younger drivers who might not otherwise have access to a car.”

The E-Car Club has been backed by Warwickshire County Council and Stratford-on-Avon District Council with money from the Department of Transport’s Local Sustainable Transport Fund to support it.

Coun Peter Butlin, Warwickshire County Council’s portfolio holder for transport, said: “Schemes like this take cars out of circulation, reduce pressure on parking, make savings for families, reduce overall car use and encourage active travel. I’m very pleased that we’ve been able to bring this initiative to Stratford.”

Coun Mike Brain, Stratford-on-Avon District Council’s portfolio holder for technical services, also highlighted the positive enviromental impact the E-Car Club would have, adding: “The project delivers on the district council’s core aim of minimising the impact of climate change.

“It is a perfect catalyst to boost the number of electric vehicles on our region’s roads.”

UK Gov: Boosting Green and Electric Car/ Low emission Car uptake with £500 Million Investment

May 17th, 2014 § Comments Off on UK Gov: Boosting Green and Electric Car/ Low emission Car uptake with £500 Million Investment § permalink

Considering the huge benefits of electric cars it’s surprising they haven’t taken off quite as much as expected. This may be because people don’t see why they should invest in an electric car when there aren’t very many charging stations.

People understandably have a fear that if they buy an electric car then they will end up on the side of the road somewhere with a dead battery. It’s true, there aren’t enough charging stations at the moment, but hopefully that is about to change. » Read the rest of this entry «

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