[img] Messy way to charge your car: hope it’s a one-off. 

June 19th, 2016 § Comments Off on [img] Messy way to charge your car: hope it’s a one-off.  § permalink

Typically charges are well tested to get o confirm to well known and relied-upon standards. But the issue I experienced is not with he unit per se, but acceptable plug dimensions.

You see, in my, Twizy charging joy – plug comes straight out the charging port – there is “only one”, as you may say, yet it is sized tad bulkier than what the replaceable plugs you may find, say at the kettle unit. For durability: wear and tear purposes, the charging unit does not support it.

In my case; original twizy plug didn’t plug in all the way, due to the extra bulk on the [particularly] width of the charging plug. This in turn would not let the pod close. This, in turn would not initiate the charging cycle. #fail.Luckily, a fellow EV driver did mention the issue in the past (which went in one ear and out the other with me – sorry) not that it was very helpful at that very point even if I realise what’s pears and what’s apples at time.


Luck has it, my trusty and emergency extension lead. You never know… Sorted the trick. See “after” photos with the White plug. That sorted it.

But it did leave the twizy being on charge in a very peculiar state of “look-like”…a mess.

Anyways, little birdie tells me these charging units (pod point?) are OEL? Will confirm. I also see new simikar(upgraded units being fitted about town, replacing both faulty and other units (which I used in the past without a hiccup) due to a possible support contract re-negotiation with Bollore(Source London)

Live and see. Comments? Leave below or DM. Otherwise do share along.

Tesla reintroduces the Model S 60. Starting at £53,400 or £410 a month

June 10th, 2016 § Comments Off on Tesla reintroduces the Model S 60. Starting at £53,400 or £410 a month § permalink

Software Upgrade to access the 75kwh battery  capacity is optional.

Software Upgrade to access the 75kwh battery capacity is optional.

Today we’re excited to reintroduce the Model S 60. Starting at £53,400 or £410 a month (details here, see representative example), the Model S 60 delivers 248 miles of range, a top speed of 130 mph and zero-to-60 acceleration in 5.5 seconds.

With all-wheel drive, the Model S 60D provides more range (253 miles) and faster acceleration (zero-to-60 in 5.2 seconds).

Like all Tesla vehicles, the 60 and 60D come standard with active safety features and Autopilot hardware. And both versions can later be upgraded through a software update to 75 kWh for about 19% extra range.

 Anyone who buys a 60 or any other new Model S or Model X between now and 15th July through the Tesla Referral Programme gets a £750 credit towards the purchase. Just get the special personal code from any Tesla owner and enter it at the time of purchase.

Twizy Travel: 2 people, 2 suitcase, 1 bag, 1 twizy #electricCar #ev ride #commute #london

June 4th, 2016 § Comments Off on Twizy Travel: 2 people, 2 suitcase, 1 bag, 1 twizy #electricCar #ev ride #commute #london § permalink

Who said you can go for a quick weekender in a #twizy…

Ok, so we had to get from A to B really, but with 45odd mile range I’d get on my Renault twizy, you can see the convenience,(or not and I won’t blame you) of the ride, vs public transport lugging all this and change several times along the way. And Before you ask: No, I don’t have another car at the moment. So twizy or train&tube&bus.

Cost of this travel option: £1 in electricity.

Cost of would be alternative public travel for two people would be £20 (+ time inconvenience)

Uber equivalent would be £50

—- so, can #twizy holiday be done?

 Yes —-

Would I do it again? 

Not really – my i3 delivery is nearly upon us. 🙂

UPDATED: 6 mths to go Until my Next #EV Lease! Let the shopping commence… Now what should that next car be? hmm. ideas?

April 30th, 2016 § Comments Off on UPDATED: 6 mths to go Until my Next #EV Lease! Let the shopping commence… Now what should that next car be? hmm. ideas? § permalink

UPDATED:

ORDERED OUR BMW i3 Rex due to be delivered on 1st July 2016  !!!

Woop Woop!

Check out my “Cheapest Electric Car Lease deal” section for more information on the lease deals.


My Nissan Leaf Lease Expiry CountDown or rather CountDown to my new #ev Deal!

Woohoo! 6 months and counting (down) until my new Electric Vehicle Lease.
Now, what would it be?.. hmm

Options Considered:

  • BMW i3 with Range Extender?
  • Outlander PHEV?
  • Mercedes Benz B Class Electric?
  • Bigger better leaf 30KWh?
  • Golf PHEV?

I guess, this summer, it’s time to Get Deal Hunting… for timely October 2016 Delivery

Requirements:

  • Big Boot (same as Leaf or bigger)
  • Minimum 25 EV Miles Range for daily commute on a single charge (even in winter)
  • Cheap(ish) and Longer Travel requirements.

Renault twizy door struts replaced. Now scissor doors spring up!

March 17th, 2016 § Comments Off on Renault twizy door struts replaced. Now scissor doors spring up! § permalink

It’s been a short-long-time coming to get this fixed up. But it’s was a relatively straight forward process, once you know what you’re facing and what’s wrong and where, as well as having aplenty video-evidence examples of this issue. 

 In my Renault twizy ownership case, it was the doors this time, which caused discomfort. It was initially a “hunch” where, during my recent servicing back in  the fall of 2015, I did point out the doors being sluggish opening up, – forcing me often to push them up forcefully when getting out of twizy – or pull them up, again, forcefully when trying to get in.
Fast forward through our London winter, with average low temperatures and we have a significant further degradation in the door opening mechanism – gas struts which push the doors open (and indeed more sluggish in colder weather) – which deteriorated to the point of lifting the door(s) a mere inch, when the door mechanism was released-open.
Last time, Renault service tech merely advised that “it opens, sorta, it works. Let us know only [when] if it gets worse.” That was then. This is now.
 YouTube video here.

http://youtu.be/c7gDDMrWfFk
Good news is. It’s all fixed. Under warranty. Free.
Following the comprehensive forum discussion and discovery of similar like-for-like cases on Twizyowners.com forum.

Turns out I’m not alone. Glad there are some alternatives out there to DIY remedy the fault as well which are quite affordable.
Luckily for me, it didn’t have to come to that, nor testing my DIY skills (phew..) – repairs done under warranty.
I have shared those videos with the Renault service team – made quite a few – to avoid being turned around again.
So, again. Good news: my Renault twizy door issue was resolved under warranty (for free).
Just collected the twizy, still cold and the doors aren’t exactly flying up, but they do work a LOT better than before and a lot springy!
https://youtu.be/sLRG2MVrKiE
Meanwhile, here is some snap of Renault’s work  

 

Baby steps: Affordability of Electric Cars Expected to Increase Rapidly

March 15th, 2016 § Comments Off on Baby steps: Affordability of Electric Cars Expected to Increase Rapidly § permalink

By 2022 it may be possible to buy an electric vehicle for the same amount as a vehicle powered by a traditional petrol or diesel engine, according to a report published by Bloomberg Business this month.

At the moment the biggest barrier to wider EV adoption is arguably their high asking price. And with infrastructural improvements and technological upgrades, this type of eco-friendly vehicle is becoming more practical by the day, leaving the upfront cost as an enduring issue.

But if analysts are accurate in their predictions, it could be just six years before the choice between EVs and other cars is not affected by such considerations.

The main reason that EVs are comparatively costly today is that the batteries required to power them still put a significant burden on the total expense of the vehicle. But the report points out that battery prices have fallen by just over a third in the past 12 months and are likely to continue to tumble as demand rises and the technology involved in manufacturing them improves.

In 2015 there was a 60 per cent increase in the number of EVs sold internationally. And within 25 years they are expected to account for 35 per cent of the market as a whole.

This suggests that petrol- and diesel-powered cars will still be in the majority by 2040, or hybrids will account for the rest of the market. But ultimately it seems like complete EV dominance is only a matter of time.

Today less than a single percentage point of the new car market is made up of EVs. But as battery prices slide southwards, the predictions made in the report suggest that a major up-tick in sales is just around the corner.

While this is great news for drivers who want to reduce the harmful emissions their motoring activities produce without feeling the sting in their wallets, there are other economic considerations involved with the rise of EVs.

Specifically, it is the industries built around supplying the fossil fuels that power current cars which are likely to suffer. And analysts believe that by 2023 the need for oil will have dropped by up to two million barrels per day.

For companies and indeed entire countries which rely on the demand for oil to survive and thrive, this could be a significant issue. Some are even warning of a looming crisis which will come if steps are not taken today to ensure that the falling need for oil is balanced by investment in other areas.

At the other end of the spectrum, there are expectations surrounding the rise in EV ownership in terms of how this will impact the electricity infrastructure of the UK and other developed nations. With more people charging up their cars at home or while parked elsewhere, the demand for power will only increase.

Globally the amount of power drawn annually by EVs could be equal to a tenth of all electricity generated around the world in 2015. This annual total of 1900 terrawatt-hours of consumption is not likely to be hit until 2040, but it gives an indication of the scale of the challenge that electricity providers are going to face.

This will no doubt lead to debates about the resources which are consumed in order to provide the electricity to charge EVs. Because getting rid of a petrol-guzzling car only to replace it with an EV that plugs into a mains connection supplied by a power station that burns coal will seem like a less than perfect solution to many motorists.

Questions about the mining processes and economic impact of extracting the minerals required to build the batteries which are found within EVs also exist. But in the long term there is no doubt that vehicles must shift away from a reliance on fossil fuels, since non-renewable resources are necessarily limited and unsustainable.

from: http://www.carcraft.co.uk/news/articles/2814/affordability-of-electric-cars-expected-to-increase-rapidly

Tesla Model 3: Everything we know about the ‘electric car of the people’

February 9th, 2016 § Comments Off on Tesla Model 3: Everything we know about the ‘electric car of the people’ § permalink

The Model 3 would be the most important moment in Tesla’s history to date. It would be the car that takes Tesla from a niche company into the mainstream by offering a fully electric car with a range of more than 200 miles and a price of less than £30,000.
With a release date falling somewhere in 2017, the Model 3 would likely arrive just as traditional car manufacturers get their own all-electric offerings into gear and off the end of the production line. With just a few weeks to go until the big reveal, here is everything we know so far.
The reveal might not be all that big… for now

Last year we heard that the Model 3 was coming in March, and with the world-famous Geneva Motor Show opening to journalists on 1 March, this appeared to make perfect sense. However, now we are not so sure. Tesla is attending the Geneva show – in Hall 4 with Honda, Renault and Toyota – but boss Elon Musk recently said the car would not be revealed until the end of the month.

Furthermore, Musk said the company is being “a little coy” with the Model 3 and would not be showing the car off in full at the late-March event. This could mean we only see a teasing, shadowy photo or that Tesla would reveal an early, non-functioning concept car, possibly with blacked-out windows and no interior.
It is to cost less than £30,000

Speaking at the Prince’s Trust Leadership Dinner in London in January, Musk said the Model 3 would cost less than £30,000. He has also previously said it would cost less than $30,000 (£20,000), but the difference here would be cancelled out by UK tax and the cost of shipping cars over from California.
At this price, the Model 3 will be positioning itself against the BMW 3-Series, Audi A4, Jaguar XE and Mercedes C-Class, all of which start between £25,000 and £30,000. This is arguably the toughest market for any car company to crack, and would open Tesla up to fleet buyers looking to order company cars in bulk for their staff.

The Model S currently stretches from £50,000 to a little more than £100,000. We don’t expect the Model 3’s price to double with options, but a spread of £30,000 to around £50,000 sounds reasonable. Will there be an £8,700 Ludicrous Mode to make the Model 3 Ferrari-fast? Possibly not, but…
It is to be faster than all of its rivals

Does anyone really expect Musk not to boast about the Model 3 being the faster car in its class? It might not have the 155mph top speed of some of its rivals, but it would still use that electric motor to launch off the line more quickly than anything else.
We suspect a 0-60mph time of four seconds (or three-point-something, if Musk really wants to brag) would be entirely possible, but don’t forget that a smaller car has to equal a smaller battery and less powerful motor. This is ‘the electric car of the people’, not a hot rod.

Render suggesting what the Tesla Model 3 may look like based on the Model S and XAuto-Moto

It would have a range of at least 200 miles

In March 2015, Musk said that 200 miles is the minimum expectation for an electric car. More specifically, he said this figure must be “real world” and not a case of the car only reaching 200 miles if the air conditioning is off and it is driven on a road as smooth as a snooker table. “Anything below 200 miles isn’t passing grade,” he added. “Most people [are] looking for 20% more than that.”
So let us take that to mean the Model 3’s target range is 240 miles – not far shy of the 275 quoted range of the cheapest Model S, the 70D, but a comfortable way behind the 340 miles of the 90D, which is twice the price of the Model 3.
But the Model 3 isn’t on sale yet, and battery technology is improving at an accelerating pace. The 200-240mph claim was made almost a year ago, and once the Model 3 goes on sale it would be two years old. Improvements between now and 2017 would likely see longer ranges across the board – but there is always be a gap to justify the higher prices of the S and X.
It is on schedule – for now

Momentum built up by the Model S was knocked back a peg by delays to the Model X. Adding cool but complex details such as the ‘falcon wing’ doors swallowed up time and money, delaying the new model and disappointing investors and consumers. Delays for six-figure cars built in small numbers by a niche company and sold to wealthy early adopters are to be expected – but Tesla wants the Model 3 to be its biggest seller and take a large slice of a forecast 500,000 annual sales by 2020, up from 50,000 in 2015.
Consumers do not expect delays when they order a new Ford, BMW, VW or Audi. In switching to Tesla, they are already taking a gamble that a small company will whisk them into the future; the last thing they will want is a delay – especially if a novelty feature such as a complicated door hinge is to blame.

The Model 3 platform is to be shared with the Model Y
Rumours spread in early 2016 claimed that Tesla was ready to announce two versions of the Model 3. This now seems unlikely, but we wouldn’t be surprised if the Model 3’s platform could be shared with other Tesla vehicles in the future. Cars made by the Volkswagen group – VW, Audi and Seat – have shared platforms and common components for some time. It’s an obvious cost-saving measure, and something that Tesla should also do. I would expect the Model 3 to be a small five-door saloon, followed by an SUV crossover like the Nissan Juke, entitled the Model Y.
In October 2015, Musk tweeted a fan asking if the “Model 3 crossover” would have falcon-wing doors. He said: “There will be a Model 3 and a Model Y. One of the two will.” Musk’s tweet was then deleted, but the story is a simple one: the Model Y will be to the Model 3 what the Model X is to the Model S.
It was supposed to be called the Model E

That last sentence made me angry at why carmakers don’t use fun, dynamic and interesting names any more. Instead of Daytona, Thunderbird, Cerbera and Spitfire, we have F12tdf, i10, C4 and Tesla’s range of seemingly unrelated Models. But hold on. In Tesla’s case we actually have Ford to blame for spoiling Musk’s joke: he originally wanted a line-up of Models S, E, X – with Y coming later. Geddit?

Well, now it’s S-3-X-Y because Ford’s lawyers came knocking, reminded Tesla that it owns the Model E trademark, and that no, it isn’t for sale. Ford also produced a Model Y, back in the 1930s, so Musk’s plans might have been thwarted there too. Sorry, Elon.

UK: Drive Model S for as little as £404 per month*

January 22nd, 2016 § Comments Off on UK: Drive Model S for as little as £404 per month* § permalink

Today, Tesla is launching a new in-house purchase option called Tesla PCP (“Personal Contract Purchase”), with enhanced flexibility and an attractive low monthly payment starting at just £404 per month. After fuel and road tax savings, that’s the equivalent of paying just £296 per month for a comparable combustion engine car. Monthly payments can be even further reduced with deposits up to 30%, or a minimum of only £2,000. With two and three year PCP options, no early repayment penalties or hidden fees, and support for various mileage terms, this new programme opens Model S ownership up to a wider audience. To celebrate the launch of Tesla PCP, we have reduced the monthly payments for a limited time only, which is already factored into the Design Studio. 

In addition to Tesla PCP, Tesla has a variety of attractive financing options available including a hire purchase programme on Model S that starts at just £600 per month. After fuel savings, this is the equivalent of only £492 per month.

10 months to go Until my New #EV Lease! Now what should that next car be? hmm. ideas? #UK

December 30th, 2015 § Comments Off on 10 months to go Until my New #EV Lease! Now what should that next car be? hmm. ideas? #UK § permalink

My Nissan Leaf Lease Expiry CountDown or rather CountDown to my new #ev Deal!

Woohoo! 10 months and counting (down) until my new Electric Vehicle Lease.
Now, what would it be?.. hmm

Options Considered:

  • BMW i3 with Range Extender?
  • Outlander PHEV?
  • Mercedes Benz B Class Electric?
  • Bigger better leaf 30KWh?
  • Golf PHEV?

 

I guess, this summer, it’s time to Get Deal Hunting… for timely October 2016 Delivery

Requirements:

  • Big Boot (same as Leaf or bigger)
  • Minimum 25 EV Miles Range for daily commute on a single charge (even in winter)
  • Cheap(ish) and Longer Travel requirements.

Daniel Kim’s Lit Motors: The Fully Enclosed electric motorcycle is in testing phase

December 21st, 2015 § Comments Off on Daniel Kim’s Lit Motors: The Fully Enclosed electric motorcycle is in testing phase § permalink

Daniel Kim is a dreamer. Like all dreamers, he has an idea for a product he thinks the world could use. His dream is a self balancing, enclosed electric motorcycle that would serve as a safe, efficient transportation pod for urban dwellers.

Lit Motors says more than a thousand people have reserved one of its auto balancing electric vehicles (AEVs). When will they receive them? “The AEV’s development timeline and delivery date are dependent on several factors: engineering development & testing, design freeze, supply chain, assembly line development, and financing,” the company says. In other words, your machine may be ready in time for Christmas, just not this Christmas.

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